"Though she knew even less about radios than about Southern Californians, there were to both outward patterns a hieroglyphic sense of concealed meaning, of an intent to communicate.”

 

I’ve had three girls in the last week, from sixteen to twenty one, relate to me stories about a guy making a move and them not wanting anything to do with it and how it was so awkward and they just didn’t want to be touched.
In none of these stories did the guy persist, but they did make moves despite body language to the contrary, and they were excused by the girls as not knowing.
It’s important to listen to body language. But girls, if you want him not to make a move or try to touch you, and he is somehow being excused for not reading your body language, it’s best to actually say DONT FUCKING TOUCH ME MAN THANKS.
Part of them not learning body language is because it’s not reinforced. Don’t be awkward. Be firm. And maybe slightly scary.
Cos it’s a little scary to watch my sixteen year old cousin excuse a guy for putting his arm around her when she was trying to move away, and then blame it on herself and not tell him to back off.

theenergyissue:

Lake Owens, California: The Dustiest Place in the U.S

After being diverted in 1913 to provide water to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, Lake Owens has become the largest source of dust pollution in the United States. Now a massive salt flat, the lake hosts a strangle new ecology: during “wet” years, for example, a briny chemical soup of bright pink halophilic (salt-loving) archaea spread across the lake bed. The lake provides half of all of L.A.’s water and is infamous as the scene of one of the fiercest and most prolonged episodes of the California Water Wars. Indeed, these events inspired parts of Roman Polanski’s Chinatown. In the late 1990s, the city of L.A. agreed to a cleanup plan which has become one of the largest dust-control projects in the U.S. To date, it has spent more than a billion dollars on dust-control measures such as shallow flooding, managed vegetation, and gravel blanketing. 

(Source: NPR)